bingbongboo fun

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bingbongboo fun

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The Real McCoy

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Ads by AdGenta.comTwenty nine year old Chicago stock dealer Joseph McCoy had an idea that eventually put millions of dollars into his bank account and his name in the dictionary of slang. He looked around to find a place where the cattle being herded from Texas could be bought together and fattened up and moved north and east for slaughter. Eventually he found a very small dead place, consisting of about one dozen log huts, low small rude affairs four fifths of which are covered with dirt. The town? Abilene. In 1867 the land around Abilene was settled watered and had excellent grass. Not it had Joe McCoy who bought most of Abilene for the princely sum of $4,250, He persuaded the cattlemen to bring in the herds, and he offered forty dollars a head of cattle about ten times the going rate at the time. Slowly the herds began to arrive. Only then did he persuade the Kansas Pacific Railroad to lay a line to the town. Then the work began. A shipping yard was built that would hold 3,000 cattle, and then later on, a hotel. Within a year Abilene was a wide open lawless cattle town. He boasted that he’d deliver two hundred thousand cattle in the first decade. He did better; in the first year alone he shipped 36,000. and within the first four years he shipped over 2 million cattle. Abilene boomed and in the meantime Joe McCoy’s name went down in history, not only as a cattle baron, but, as he liked to say, “the real McCoy”

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Real Ale Drinkers Drink Up

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There are more than 2,000 different real ales produced in Britain. According to the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) this is more than at any time since 1971. Around 80 new breweries begain producing real ale in the past year alone.

Each of about 500 “micro breweries” across Britain produce up to 30,000 barrels of real ale every year.

That means one out of every five barrels of cask beer is now made by micro breweries – up from 14% in 2003.

The UK government’s reduction in duty for small breweries has helped boost the number of new producers.

Those that like a good pint of beer with character and taste are turning to real ales more and more. The over hyped national brands such as Fosters, John Smiths, and others are avoided as they lack any kind of taste.

The Society of Independent Brewers, which represents most of Britain’s small breweries, reported a 12% sales increase for most members in its 2005 annual report.

The big breweries seem to simply concentrate on volume and profit and rely on heavy TV advertising to promote their products.

Roger Protz from CAMRA says “Beers with aroma and flavour are back in vogue and smaller breweries are rushing to meet the clamour from consumers.”

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Another Eye to the World