Separation of Powers ? 2003-Separation of Powers: …

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Separation of Powers ? 2003-Separation of Powers: “Introduction

While its theoretical origins are of European descent, the modern doctrine of Separation of Powers found its first ab initio application in the New World. As instituted in the United States, the doctrine is premised on the notion that political power is prone to be abused and therefore undue concentration of such power should be avoided at all costs. The Framers of the U.S. Constitution believed that if the three functions of governmental authority-legislative, executive and judicial-were ever united, tyranny would ensue. In words of James Madison in The Federalist No. 48, ‘the accumulation of all powers, legislative, executive, and judiciary, in the same hands, whether of one, a few, or many . . . may justly be pronounced the very definition of tyranny.’ A corollary to the American manifestation of the doctrine is that the three branches should tend to counterbalance one another; the result being that none of the branches in theory should become ascendant (at least not for long), and in true Enlightenment fashion, this counterbalancing would tend to produce an equilibrium of governmental power. At the same time, it is also posited that Separation of Powers as a doctrine is closely linked to maintenance of the rule of law. With each branch of government playing its own unique role in the legal process (lawmaking, law enforcing, law interpreting), the chance for subversion of the rule of law is thought to be reduced accordingly.

This enduring doctrine, while simple in theory, is supple in practice. To paraphrase Woodrow Wilson, the doctrine’s development in the United States has owed more to Darwin than to Newton. The complex interplay between theory and reality, separation of function and the need for efficiency, and formal versus informal asp”

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magazineUSA.com – US-POLITICS: The Political Syste…

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magazineUSA.com – US-POLITICS: The Political System: Constitution, Executive, Legislative and Judicial Branches

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The Real McCoy

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 Ads by AdGenta.comTwenty nine year old Chicago stock dealer Joseph McCoy had an idea that eventually put millions of dollars into his bank account and his name in the dictionary of slang. He looked around to find a place where the cattle being herded from Texas could be bought together and fattened up and moved north and east for slaughter. Eventually he found a very small dead place, consisting of about one dozen log huts, low small rude affairs four fifths of which are covered with dirt. The town? Abilene. In 1867 the land around Abilene was settled watered and had excellent grass. Not it had Joe McCoy who bought most of Abilene for the princely sum of $4,250, He persuaded the cattlemen to bring in the herds, and he offered forty dollars a head of cattle about ten times the going rate at the time. Slowly the herds began to arrive. Only then did he persuade the Kansas Pacific Railroad to lay a line to the town. Then the work began. A shipping yard was built that would hold 3,000 cattle, and then later on, a hotel. Within a year Abilene was a wide open lawless cattle town. He boasted that he’d deliver two hundred thousand cattle in the first decade. He did better; in the first year alone he shipped 36,000. and within the first four years he shipped over 2 million cattle. Abilene boomed and in the meantime Joe McCoy’s name went down in history, not only as a cattle baron, but, as he liked to say, "the real McCoy"

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Another Eye to the World